The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent Early American Studies

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University of Pennsylvania Press #ad - Drawing on archaeology and oral history, as well as documents in English, and Spanish, French, DuVal chronicles the successive migrations of Indians and Europeans to the area from precolonial times through the 1820s. Placing indians at the center of the story, DuVal shows both their diversity and our contemporary tendency to exaggerate the influence of Europeans in places far from their centers of power.

Europeans were often more dependent on Indians than Indians were on them. Now the states of arkansas, this native ground was originally populated by indigenous peoples, Kansas, became part of the French and Spanish empires, Oklahoma, and Colorado, and in 1803 was bought by the United States in the Louisiana Purchase.

As citizens of the united states, they persuaded the federal government to muster its resources on behalf of their dreams of landholding and citizenship. With keen insight and broad vision, Kathleen DuVal retells the story of Indian and European contact in a more complex and, ultimately, more satisfactory way.

The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent Early American Studies #ad - . After the war of 1812, these settlers came in numbers large enough to overwhelm the region's inhabitants and reject the early patterns of cross-cultural interdependence. Along the banks of the arkansas and Mississippi rivers, and London, Madrid, far from Paris, European colonialism met neither accommodation nor resistance but incorporation.

In the native ground, kathleen duval argues that it was Indians rather than European would-be colonizers who were more often able to determine the form and content of the relations between the two groups. Rather than being colonized, sustenance, Indians drew European empires into local patterns of land and resource allocation, goods exchange, gender relations, diplomacy, and warfare.

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Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West

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Harvard University Press #ad - This book is a passionate reminder of the high costs that the making of American history occasioned for many indigenous peoples. In this ambitious book that ranges across the Great Basin, Blackhawk places Native peoples at the center of a dynamic story as he chronicles two centuries of Indian and imperial history that shaped the American West.

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Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - She demonstrates that between the 1690s and 1780s, indian peoples including Caddos, Apaches, Wichitas, Payayas, Karankawas, and Comanches formed relationships with Spaniards in Texas that refuted European claims of imperial control. Barr argues that indians not only retained control over their territories but also imposed control over Spaniards.

. Revising the standard narrative of european-Indian relations in America, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, resist, and persevere. Because native systems of kin-based social and political order predominated, argues Barr, Indian concepts of gender cut across European perceptions of racial difference.

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands #ad - Instead of being defined in racial terms, diplomatic relations between the Indians and Spaniards in the region were dictated by Indian expressions of power, as was often the case with European constructions of power, grounded in gendered terms of kinship. By examining six realms of encounter--first contact, warfare, diplomacy, and captivity--Barr shows that native categories of gender provided the political structure of Indian-Spanish relations by defining people's identity, status, settlement and intermarriage, mission life, and obligations vis-a-vis others.

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Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860 History of the American West

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Nebraska #ad - A study of the role of family and trade networks in shaping the American West in the nineteenth century.

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The Comanche Empire The Lamar Series in Western History

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Yale University Press #ad - With extensive knowledge and deep insight, the author brings into clear relief the Comanches’ remarkable impact on the trajectory of history. This powerful empire, political prestige, commercial reach, built by the Comanche Indians, economic power, eclipsed its various European rivals in military prowess, and cultural influence.

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, a Native American empire rose to dominate the fiercely contested lands of the American Southwest, the southern Great Plains, and northern Mexico. Pekka hämäläinen shows in vivid detail how the Comanches built their unique empire and resisted European colonization, and why they fell to defeat in 1875.

The Comanche Empire The Lamar Series in Western History #ad - It is a story that challenges the idea of indigenous peoples as victims of European expansion and offers a new model for the history of colonial expansion, colonial frontiers, and Native-European relations in North America and elsewhere. Yet, until now, the Comanche empire has gone unrecognized in American history.

This compelling and original book uncovers the lost story of the Comanches.

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Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution

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Random House #ad - Independence lost is a bold work that fully establishes the reputation of a historian who is already regarded as one of her generation’s best. Praise for independence Lost“An astonishing story. Duval introduces us to the mobile slave petit jean, margaret o’brien pollock, who risked their own wealth to organize funds and garner spanish support for the American Revolution; the half-Scottish-Creek leader Alexander McGillivray, who worked to keep his people out of war; New Orleans merchant Oliver Pollock and his wife, who organized militias to fight the British at sea; the Chickasaw diplomat Payamataha, who fought to protect indigenous interests from European imperial encroachment; the Cajun refugee Amand Broussard, who spent a lifetime in conflict with the British; and Scottish loyalists James and Isabella Bruce, whose work on behalf of the British Empire placed them in grave danger.

Independence Lost will knock your socks off. A rising-star historian offers a significant new global perspective on the revolutionary war with the story of the conflict as seen through the eyes of the outsiders of colonial society Winner of the Journal of the American Revolution Book of the Year Award • Winner of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey History Prize • Finalist for the George Washington Book Prize Over the last decade, award-winning historian Kathleen DuVal has revitalized the study of early America’s marginalized voices.

Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution #ad - While citizens of the thirteen rebelling colonies came to blows with the British Empire over tariffs and parliamentary representation, the situation on the rest of the continent was even more fraught. Fenn, pulitzer prize–winning author of Encounters at the Heart of the World. Adding new depth and moral complexity, Kathleen DuVal reinvigorates the story of the American Revolution.

To read this book is to see that the task of recovering the entire American Revolution has barely begun.

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An Infinity of Nations: How the Native New World Shaped Early North America Early American Studies

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University of Pennsylvania Press #ad - The anishinaabe and dakota peoples of the great Lakes and Northern Great Plains dominated the politics and political economy of these interconnected regions, which were pivotal to the fur trade and the emergent world economy. Instead, native peoples forged a New World of their own. An infinity of nations explores the formation and development of a Native New World in North America.

. Moving between cycles of alliance and competition, the anishinaabeg and Dakota carved out a place for Native peoples in modern North America, and between peace and violence, ensuring not only that they would survive as independent and distinct Native peoples but also that they would be a part of the new community of nations who made the New World.

Most of the continent's indigenous peoples, were not conquered, assimilated, however, or even socially incorporated into the settlements and political regimes of this Atlantic New World. This history, the evolution of a distinctly Native New World, is a foundational story that remains largely untold in histories of early America.

An Infinity of Nations: How the Native New World Shaped Early North America Early American Studies #ad - Through imaginative use of both native language and European documents, historian Michael Witgen recreates the world of the indigenous peoples who ruled the western interior of North America. To be sure, things, native north america experienced far-reaching and radical change following contact with the peoples, and ideas that flowed inland following the creation of European colonies on North American soil.

Until the middle of the nineteenth century, indigenous peoples controlled the vast majority of the continent while European colonies of the Atlantic World were largely confined to the eastern seaboard.

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The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815 Studies in North American Indian History

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Cambridge University Press #ad - Finally, the book tells of the breakdown of accommodation and common meanings and the re-creation of the Indians as alien and exotic. Here the older worlds of the Algonquians and of various Europeans overlapped, and their mixture created new systems of meaning and of exchange. It is, instead, about a search for accommodation and common meaning.

The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815 Studies in North American Indian History #ad - It tells how europeans and indians met, and how between 1650 and 1815 they constructed a common, as other, regarding each other as alien, as virtually nonhuman, mutually comprehensible world in the region around the Great Lakes that the French called pays d'en haut. An acclaimed book and widely acknowledged classic, The Middle Ground steps outside the simple stories of Indian-white relations - stories of conquest and assimilation and stories of cultural persistence.

First published in 1991, the 20th anniversary edition includes a new preface by the author examining the impact and legacy of this study.

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Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People

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Hill and Wang #ad - We know of them mostly because lewis and clark spent the winter of 1804-1805 with them, but why don't we know more? Who were they really? In this extraordinary book, Elizabeth A. Winner of the 2015 pulitzer prize for historyencounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe.

The damage wrought by imported diseases like smallpox and the havoc caused by the arrival of horses and steamboats were tragic for the Mandans, as Fenn makes clear, yet, their sense of themselves as a people with distinctive traditions endured. Her boldly original interpretation of these diverse research findings offers us a new perspective on early American history, a new interpretation of the American past.

Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People #ad - . A riveting account of mandan history, landscapes, and people, Fenn's narrative is enriched and enlivened not only by science and research but by her own encounters at the heart of the world. Fenn retrieves their history by piecing together important new discoveries in archaeology, climatology, geology, epidemiology, anthropology, and nutritional science.

By 1500, more than twelve thousand mandans were established on the northern Plains, agricultural skills, and their commercial prowess, and reputation for hospitality became famous. Recent archaeological discoveries show how these Native American people thrived, and then how they collapsed.

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Storm of the Sea: Indians and Empires in the Atlantic's Age of Sail

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Oxford University Press #ad - The wabanaki fortified their longstanding dominion over the region's land- and seascape by co-opting European sailing technology and regularly plundering the waves of European ships, sailors, and cargo. In storm of the Sea, Matthew R. Bahar instead tells the forgotten history of Indian pirates hijacking European sailing ships on the rough waters of the north Atlantic and of an Indian navy pressing British seamen into its ranks.

From their earliest encounters with europeans in the sixteenth century to the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763, the Wabanaki Indians of northern New England and the Canadian Maritimes fought to enhance their relationship with the ocean and the colonists it brought to their shores. Narratives of cultural encounter in colonial North America often contrast traditional Indian coastal-dwellers and intrepid European seafarers.

This native maritime world clashed with the relentless efforts of Europeans to supplant it with one more amenable to their imperial designs. Ashore, indian diplomats engaged in shrewd transatlantic negotiations with imperial officials of French Acadia and New England. Positioning indians into the age of Sail, imperial, Storm of the Sea offers an original perspective on Native American, and Atlantic history.

Storm of the Sea: Indians and Empires in the Atlantic's Age of Sail #ad - Their seaborne raids developed both a punitive and extractive character; they served at once as violent and honorable retribution for the destructive pressures of colonialism in Indian country and as a strategic enterprise to secure valuable plunder. Their campaign of sea and shore brought wealth, honor, and power to their confederacy while alienating colonial neighbors and thwarting English and French imperialism through devastating attacks.

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The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs The Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity

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Yale University Press #ad - For the makahs, a tribal nation at the most northwestern point of the contiguous United States, a deep relationship with the sea is the locus of personal and group identity. Joshua L. This book is the first to explore the history and identity of the Makahs from the arrival of maritime fur-traders in the eighteenth century through the intervening centuries and to the present day.

. Reid discovers that the “people of the Cape” were far more involved in shaping the maritime economy of the Pacific Northwest than has been understood. The author also addresses current environmental debates relating to the tribe's customary whaling and fishing rights and illuminates the efforts of the Makahs to regain control over marine space, preserve their marine-oriented identity, and articulate a traditional future.

The Sea Is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs The Henry Roe Cloud Series on American Indians and Modernity #ad - He examines makah attitudes toward borders and boundaries, their efforts to exercise control over their waters and resources as Europeans and Americans arrived, and their embrace of modern opportunities and technology to maintain autonomy and resist assimilation. Unlike most other indigenous tribes whose lives are tied to lands, the Makah people have long placed marine space at the center of their culture, finding in their own waters the physical and spiritual resources to support themselves.

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